Mathematics Degree Plans and Courses


Students seeking a Bachelor of Arts in Mathematics, Bachelor of Science in Mathematics or Bachelor of Science in Mathematics with Teacher Certification (8-12) should meet with an academic advisor. See course schedule link for suggested sequence.

Degree Plans

Bachelor of Arts in Mathematics
Bachelor of Science in Mathematics
Bachelor of Science with Teacher Certification (8-12)
 

Minor in Mathematics

The minimum requirement shall be 18 hours to include Math 2414 (Calculus II), MATH 3325 and 9 additional hours of upper division math electives excluding MATH 3350, MATH 3360 and MATH 4301.

 

Coming in Fall 2018  – Minor in Mathematical Biology

 

 Course Descriptions (MATH).

1014. College Algebra Recitation. (0-1)
This mathematics recitation course has been designed to supplement MATH 1314: College Algebra. Recitation time is designed to give college algebra students extra time, help, and instruction that is valuable for success in the course. Must be enrolled in corresponding MATH 1314 section. Prerequisites: Evidence of math equivalent to high school Algebra II (grade of 'C' or higher) or placement. TSI Mathematics. Corequisite: MATH 1314.

1024. Mathematics for Business and Social Sciences I Recitation. (0-1)
This mathematics recitation course has been designed to supplement MATH 1324: Mathematics for Business and Social Sciences I. Recitation time is designed to give Mathematics for Business and Social Sciences I students extra time, help, and instruction that is valuable for success in the course. Must be enrolled in corresponding MATH 1324 section. Prerequisites: Evidence of math equivalent to high school Algebra II (grade of 'C' or higher) or placement. TSI Mathematics. Corequisite: MATH 1324.

1025. Mathematics for Business and Social Sciences II Recitation. (0-1)
This mathematics recitation course has been designed to supplement MATH 1325: Mathematics for Business and Social Sciences II. Recitation time is designed to give Mathematics for Business and Social Sciences II students extra time, help, and instruction that is valuable for success in the course. Must be enrolled in corresponding MATH 1325 section. Prerequisite: MATH 1314, MATH 1324, or equivalent, or department approval. Corequisite: MATH 1325.

1042. Introductory Statistics Recitation. (0-1)
This mathematics recitation course has been designed to supplement MATH 1342: Introductory Statistics. Recitation time is designed to give Introductory Statistics students extra time, help, and instruction that is valuable for success in the course. Must be enrolled in corresponding MATH 1342 section. Corequisite: MATH 1342.

1314. College Algebra. 3(3-0)
In-depth study and applications of polynomial, rational, radical, exponential and logarithmic functions, and systems of equations using matrices. Additional topics such as sequences, series, probability, and conics may be included. This course meets the standards for the Mathematics category of courses under the core curriculum. Prerequisite: Evidence of math equivalent to High School Algebra II (“C” or higher) or placement. TSI Math. Corequisite: MATH 1014.

1316. Trigonometry. 3(3-0)
This course is a study of trigonometric functions, their properties, and applications of trigonometric functions of angles, degree and radian measure, circular functions, graphs, identities, inverse trigonometric functions, polar coordinates, solution of general triangles, and complex numbers. Prerequisite: Math 1314 with a minimum grade of "C" or equivalent as approved by department. TSI MATH.

1324. Mathematics for Business and Social Sciences I. 3(3-0)
Students will study topics from college algebra (linear equations, quadratic equations, functions and graphs, inequalities), mathematics of finance (simple and compound interest, annuities), linear programming, matrices, systems of linear equations, and applications to management, business and social sciences. This course meets the standards for the Mathematics category of courses under the core curriculum. Prerequisite: Evidence of math equivalent to High School Algebra II (“C” of higher) or placement. TSI Math. Corequisite: MATH 1024.

1325. Mathematics for Business and Social Sciences II. 3(3-0)
This course is the basic study of limits and continuity, differentiation, optimization and graphing, and integration of elementary functions with emphasis on applications in business, economics, and social sciences. This course is not a substitute for MATH 2413, Calculus I. Prerequisite: MATH 1314 College Algebra or MATH 1324 Mathematics for Business and Social Sciences (with a grade of “C” or higher) or equivalent or department approval. Corequisite: MATH 1025.

1332. Contemporary Mathematics I. 3(3-0)
This course is a study of an introduction to treatments of sets, logic, number systems, number theory, relations, functions, probability, and statistics. Appropriate applications are included. This course meets the standards for the Mathematics category of courses under the core curriculum. Prerequisite: Evidence of math equivalent to High School Algebra II or placement. TSI Requirement Math.

1342. Introductory Statistics. 3(3-0)
Students will study the collection, analysis, presentation and interpretation of data, and probability. Analysis includes descriptive statistics, correlation and regression, confidence intervals and hypothesis testing. Appropriate technology used. This course meets the standards for the Mathematics category of courses under the core curriculum. Prerequisite: Evidence of math equivalent to High School Algebra II ("C" or higher) or placement. TSI requirement: Math. Corequisite: MATH 1042.

1350. Fundamentals of Mathematics I. 3(3-0)
Study of the concepts of sets, functions, numeration systems, number theory, and properties of the natural numbers, integers, rational, and real number systems with an emphasis on problem solving and critical thinking. Prerequisites: MATH 1314 College Algebra or equivalent.

1351. Fundamentals of Mathematics II. 3(3-0)
Study of the concepts of geometry, probability, and statistics, as well as applications of the algebraic properties of real numbers to concepts of measurement with an emphasis on problem solving and critical thinking. This course is designed specifically for student who seek middle grade (4 through 8) teacher certification. Prerequisites: MATH 1350 with a grade of “C” or higher or equivalent.

2113. Calculus I Lab. 1(0-1)
This course provides a lab framework for exploring and reinforcing calculus concepts studied in MATH 2313 and must be taken concurrently with Math 2313. Prerequisite: MATH 2312 Pre-Calculus with a grade of “C” or higher or equivalent or permission of department. Corequisite: MATH 2313.

2114. Calculus II Lab. 1(0-1)
This course provides a lab framework for exploring and reinforcing calculus concepts studied in MATH 2314 and must be taken concurrently with Math 2314. Prerequisite: MATH 2313 Calculus I and MATH 2113 both with a grade of “C” or higher or equivalent or permission of department. Corequisite: MATH 2314.

2312. Pre-Calculus. 3(3-0)
In-depth study and applications of polynomial, rational, radical, exponential and logarithmic functions, and systems of equations using matrices. Additional topics such as sequences, series, probability, and conics may be included. This course meets the standards for the Mathematics category of courses under the core curriculum and address the following required objectives: Critical Thinking, Communication, and Empirical Quantitative Skills. Prerequisite: MATH 1314 College Algebra with a grade of “C” or higher.

2313. Calculus I. 3(3-0)
The course encompasses the study of limits, continuity, and derivatives of algebraic, trigonometric and transcendental functions and related applications to include maximizing or minimizing a function and rate of change problems. This course also introduces the definite integral, the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus and application to calculation of areas. Curve sketching and graphing tools will be utilized in exploring these concepts. Must be taken concurrently with MATH 2113. Prerequisite: MATH 2312 Pre-Calculus with a grade of 'C' or higher, or equivalent or permission of department. Corequisite: MATH 2113.

2314. Calculus II. 3(3-0)
Calculus II, a continuation of Calculus I, encompasses the study of integration of transcendental functions, techniques of integration, polar coordinates, improper integrals, sequences, and series. Must be taken concurrently with MATH 2114. Prerequisite: MATH 2313 Calculus I and MATH 2113 both with a grade of 'C' or higher, or equivalent or permission by department. Corequisite: MATH 2114.

2390. Topics in Mathematics. V:1-4
Different topics in mathematics will be covered at varying times. May be repeated for credit with consent of the department. Prerequisite: Math 1314 or Math 1324 with a grade of "C" or higher, or consent of the instructor.

3301. Biostatistics. 3(3-0)
This course is for students in biology, health sciences, human sciences and wildlife science. Content includes descriptive and inferential statistics, basic probability concepts, probability distributions, statistical significance and hypotheses testing, correlation, simple linear regression, introduction to ANOVA, and interpreting statistical software output. May not be taken for credit as a math elective for students who major or minor in math. Prerequisite: MATH 1314.

3320. Differential Equations. 3(3-0)
The ordinary differential equations of physics, chemistry and engineering; methods for their solution and the properties of their solution. Introduction to partial differential equations. Prerequisite: MATH 2314 and MATH 2114 (or MATH 2414); all prerequisites require a grade of “C” or higher.

3321. Applied Partial Differential Equations 3(3-0) 
This course provides an introduction to the basic concepts and widely used techniques of partial differential equations (PDEs) that are frequently used by applied scientists and engineers, et al. Topics covered include: PDEs and boundary value problems, waves and diffusions, Fourier series, the Laplace equation, the heat equation, harmonic functions, Green identities and Green functions, vibrations of continuous systems, the potential equation, and spectral methods for eigenvalue problems. Pre-requisite: MATH 3415 Calculus III and MATH 3320 Differential Equations with a grade of “C” or higher.

3325. Introduction to Mathematical Proofs. 3(3-0)
This course is a study of the principles and techniques of interpreting, discovering and writing correct mathematical proofs. Students learn to independently prove theorems from various areas in mathematics, which may include topics from logic, the structure of the real number system, number theory, geometry and algebra. Prerequisite: MATH 2313 and MATH 2113 (or MATH 2413); all prerequisites require a grade of “C” or higher.

3340. Linear Algebra with Applications. 3(3-0)
Systems of linear equations, matrices, determinants, vector spaces, eigenvectors, eigenvalues, orthogonality, linear transformations and their representations by matrices, and applications. MATH 2313 and MATH 2113 (or MATH 2413); all prerequisites require a grade of “C” or higher.

3350. Probability and Statistics for Teachers. 3(3-0)
Principles and practices of probability and statistics designed for education students seeking a Generalist (4-8) with Math concentration degree. The course explores statistical applications, applying descriptive statistics, interval estimates, hypothesis tests, linear regression with an emphasis on data description and interpretation. Prerequisite: Math 1314. May not be taken for credit as a math elective for students who major or minor in math.

3360. Modern Geometry. 3(3-0)
An axiomatic approach to geometry to include contrasting traditional and modern approaches to geometry, an introduction to non-Euclidean geometry with historical perspectives, and applications. May not be taken for credit as a math elective for students who minor in math. Prerequisite: Math 3325 with a grade of "C" or higher.

3370. Discrete Mathematics. 3(3-0)
This course covers many topics in mathematics which are important in computer science. Some of these topics are sets, relations, functions, algorithms, graphs, monoids, lattices, Boolean algebras and graphs. Prerequisite: MATH 3320, MATH 3325, MATH 3340 or MATH 3415; all prerequisites require a grade of “C” or higher.

3371. Problem Solving with Computers. 3(3-0)
Introduction to computational mathematics with a focus on strategies for solving problems using Computer Algebra Systems in various applications. Prerequisite: MATH 2313 (taken with MATH 2113 Calculus I Lab) or MATH 2413 or MATH 1325, with a grade of “C” or higher.

3372. Mathematical Biology 3(3-0)
Students will investigate mathematical biology models such as population growth for single species and multiple species, infectious disease dynamics models, biochemical enzyme reactions, and biological oscillations. Appropriate mathematical techniques are applied to analyze the models and obtain solutions. Model improvement will also be evaluated for more practical modeling effects. Prerequisite:  MATH 2313 Calculus I (taken with MATH 2113 Calculus I Lab) or MATH 1325 Mathematics for Business and Social Sciences II.

3373. Mathematical Physiology 3(3-0)
This course introduces mathematical physiology models that describe various important functioning principles of human organs. Appropriate variables are included to capture the factors of interest. Students will study variables that are significant in maintaining a healthy physiological process and apply models to predict future pathological processes. Prerequisite: MATH 3372 Mathematical Biology.

3415. Calculus III. 4(3-0-2) 
This course covers sequences and series, functions of several variables, three dimensional geometry, partial derivatives, multiple integrals, line and surface integrals, Green's Theorem, Stroke's Theorem, and applications. Prerequisite: MATH 2314 or MATH 2414. 

3320. Differential Equations. 3(3-0) 
The ordinary differential equations of physics, chemistry and engineering; methods for their solution and the properties of their solution. Introduction to partial differential equations. Prerequisite: MATH 2414. 

3325. An Introduction to Mathematical Proofs. 3(3-0) 
Principles and techniques of discovering and writing correct mathematical proofs. Independently prove theorems from various areas in mathematics, which may include topics from logic, the structure of the real number system, number theory, geometry and algebra. Prerequisite: MATH 2413. 

3340. Linear Algebra with Applications. 3(3-0) 
Systems of linear equations, matrices, determinants, vector spaces, eigenvectors, eigenvalues, orthogonality, linear transformations and their representations by matrices, and applications. MATH 2413. Laboratory fee, $5. 

3350. Probability and Statistics for Teachers. 3(3-0) 
Principles and practices of probability and statistics designed for education students seeking a Generalist (4-8) with Math concentration degree. The course explores statistical applications applying descriptive statistics, interval estimates, hypothesis tests, linear regression with an emphasis on data description and interpretation. Prerequisite: Math 1314.  May not be taken for credit as a math elective for students who major or minor in math. 

3360. Modern Geometry. 3(3-0) 
An axiomatic approach to geometry to include contrasting traditional and modern approaches to geometry, an introduction to non-Euclidean geometry with historical perspectives, and applications. Prerequisite: Math 3325. 

3370. Discrete Mathematics. 3(3-0) 
This course covers many topics in mathematics which are important in computer science. Some of these topics are sets, relations, functions, algorithms, graphs, monoids, lattices, Boolean algebras and graphs. Prerequisite: 3 semester hours of advanced mathematics. 

3371. Problem Solving with Computers. 3(3-0) 
Brief historical overview of computing and computers; strategies for solving problems by computers; programming in a higher level language. Not applicable for credit in the physical sciences or engineering. Prerequisite: MATH 2413.

3390. Selected Topics in Mathematics. 3(3-0) 
Different topics will be covered at varying times. May be repeated for credit with consent of the instructor. Prerequisite: 3 semester hours of advanced mathematics. 

4301. Biostatistics. 3(3-0) 
For students in biology, health sciences, human sciences and wildlife science. Descriptive and inferential statistics, basic probability concepts, probability distributions, estimation, hypothesis testing, correlation, simple linear regression, principles of epidemiology, statistical vs. clinical significance and quasi-statistical methods. Prerequisite: MATH 1314. Laboratory fee: $5. 

4303. Statistical Methods. 3(3-0) 
Calculus-based probability, discrete and continuous random variables, joint distributions, sampling distributions, the central limit theorem, descriptive statistics, interval estimates, hypothesis tests, ANOVA, correlation and simple regression. Prerequisite: MATH 2414. 

4321. Real Variables. 3(3-0) 
The real number system, its structure and properties. Properties of real functions and sequences, including uniform continuity and the Cauchy criterion. Introduction to the theory of sets. Theory and application of the derivative. Introductory concepts of function spaces, norms and metrics. Prerequisite: 6 semester hours of advanced mathematics, including MATH 3325. 

4330 Number Theory. (3-0) 
The course explores fundamental concepts in elementary number theory to include divisibility, congruence relations, rational integers, Diophantine equations, quadratic reciprocity, integral domains, and related topics. Prerequisites: Math 3325 and Math 3370. 

4340. Modern Algebra. 3(3-0) 
Properties of the Integers: divisibility, prime factorization and congruences. Integral domains, rings and fields. Groups, permutations and cosets. A historical development of these topics is included. Not applicable for credit in the physical sciences or engineering. Prerequisite: MATH 3325. 

4341. Linear Algebra and Matrix Theory. 3(3-0) 
Vector spaces, subspaces, bases and dimension. Orthogonality, normal forms, eigenvalues, linear and special transformations, and applications. Prerequisite: 6 semester hours of advanced mathematics or permission of instructor. Laboratory fee, $5. 

4345. Communicating Mathematics in the Workplace. 3 (3-0) 
This course is designed to connect the application of mathematical concepts from various core courses to communicate mathematical results effectively within a work environment. Topics include different roles a mathematician may take within an organization with emphasis on communicating and presenting results when applying various levels of modeling, analysis, and mathematical concepts. Prerequisite: Math 3320 and Math 3370. 

4350. Probability. 3(3-0) 
Sample spaces, combinatorics, independence, conditional probability and Bayes' rule. Discrete and continuous probability distributions, Chebychev's inequality and limit theorems. Prerequisite: MATH 3415 or consent of instructor. 

4370. Vector Analysis. 3(3-0) 
Vector algebra and geometry. Scalar and vector products. Vector functions and motion in polar coordinates. Scalar and vector fields with applications to line and surface integrals. Prerequisites: MATH 3415 and MATH 3320 or equivalent. 

4380.  Special Topics in Mathematics. V:1-3
May be individualized instruction, independent study and/or research at an advanced level in a specialized content area under the direction of a faculty member.  May be repeated when the topic varies.  Prerequisites:  nine semester hours of advanced math beyond MATH 3325 or consent of department head.

4371. The Laplace Transformation and its Applications. 3(3-0) 
An introduction to the theory of the Laplace Transformation. Applications to the solution of ordinary and partial differential equations, integral equations, difference equations and integro-differential equations. An introduction to other types of integral transformations. Prerequisites: MATH 3415 and MATH 3320. 

4374. Numerical Analysis. 3(3-0) 
The mathematical formation of the concepts in numerical analysis. These concepts include the theory of errors, roots of equations, interpolation, linear systems of equations, numerical differentiation, and integration and solutions of ordinary differential equations. Prerequisites: MATH 3415 and MATH 3320.